July 10, 2018

 What can you deduct when volunteering?

  Because donations to charity of cash or property generally are tax deductible (if you itemize), it only seems logical that the   donation of something even more valuable to you — your time — would also be deductible. Unfortunately, that’s not the case.

  Donations of time or services aren’t deductible. It doesn’t matter if it’s simple administrative work, such as checking in attendees at a fundraising event, or if it’s work requiring significant experience and expertise that would be much more costly to the charity if it had to pay for it, such as skilled carpentry or legal counsel.

  However, you potentially can deduct out-of-pocket costs associated with your volunteer work.

  The basic rules:

  As with any charitable donation, for you to be able to deduct your volunteer expenses, the first requirement is that the organization be a qualified charity. You can use the IRS’s “Tax Exempt Organization Search” tool (formerly “Select Check”) at https://www.irs.gov/charities-non-profits/tax-exempt-organization-search to find out.

  Assuming the charity is qualified, you may be able to deduct out-of-pocket costs that are:

  • Unreimbursed
  • Directly connected with the services you’re providing
  • Incurred only because of your charitable work
  • Not “personal, living or family” expenses.


  Supplies, uniforms and transportation

  A wide variety of expenses can qualify for the deduction. For example, supplies you use in the activity may be deductible. And the cost of a uniform you must wear during the activity may also be deductible (if it’s required and not something you’d wear when not volunteering).

  Transportation costs to and from the volunteer activity generally are deductible, either the actual cost or 14 cents per charitable mile driven. But you have to be the volunteer. If, say, you drive your elderly mother to the nature center where she’s volunteering, you can’t deduct the cost.

  You also can’t deduct transportation costs you’d be incurring even if you weren’t volunteering. For example, if you take a commuter train downtown to work, then walk to a nearby volunteer event after work and take the train back home afterwards, you won’t be able to deduct your train fares. But if you take a cab from work to the volunteer event, then you potentially can deduct the cab fare for that leg of your transportation.

  Volunteer travel

  Transportation costs may also be deductible for out-of-town travel associated with volunteering. This can include air, rail and bus transportation; driving expenses; and taxi or other transportation costs between an airport or train station and wherever you’re staying. Lodging and meal costs also might be deductible.

  The key to deductibility is that there is no significant element of personal pleasure, recreation or vacation in the travel. That said, according to the IRS, the deduction for travel expenses won’t be denied simply because you enjoy providing services to the charitable organization. But you must be volunteering in a genuine and substantial sense throughout the trip. If only a small portion of your trip involves volunteer work, your travel expenses generally won’t be deductible.

  Keep careful records!

  The IRS may challenge charitable deductions for out-of-pocket costs, so it’s important to keep careful records. If you have questions about what volunteer expenses are and aren’t deductible, please contact us.

© 2018

February 7, 2019

Why you shouldn’t wait to file your 2018 income tax return

The IRS opened the 2018 income tax return filing season on January 28. Even if you typically don’t file until much closer to the April 15 deadline, this year consider filing as soon as you can. Why? You can potentially protect yourself from tax identity theft — and reap other benefits, too.

What is tax identity theft?

In a tax identity theft scheme, a thief uses your personal information to file a fraudulent tax return early in the filing season and claim a bogus refund.

You discover the fraud when you file your return and are informed by the IRS that the return has been rejected because one with your Social Security number has already been filed for the same tax year. While you should ultimately be able to prove that your return is the legitimate one, tax identity theft can cause major headaches to straighten out and significantly delay your refund.

Filing early may be your best defense: If you file first, it will be the tax return filed by a would-be thief that will be rejected — not yours.

What if you haven’t received your W-2s and 1099s?

To file your tax return, you must have received all of your W-2s and 1099s. January 31 was the deadline for employers to issue 2018 Form W-2 to employees and, generally, for businesses to issue Form 1099 to recipients of any 2018 interest, dividend or reportable miscellaneous income payments.

If you haven’t received a W-2 or 1099, first contact the entity that should have issued it. If that doesn’t work, you can contact the IRS for help.

What are other benefits of filing early?

Besides protecting yourself from tax identity theft, the most obvious benefit of filing early is that, if you’re getting a refund, you’ll get that refund sooner. The IRS expects more than nine out of ten refunds to be issued within 21 days.

But even if you owe tax, filing early can be beneficial. You still won’t need to pay your tax bill until April 15, but you’ll know sooner how much you owe and can plan accordingly. Keep in mind that some taxpayers who typically have gotten refunds in the past could find themselves owing tax when they file their 2018 return due to tax law changes under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) and reduced withholding from 2018 paychecks.

Need help?

If you have questions about tax identity theft or would like help filing your 2018 return early, please contact us. While the new Form 1040 essentially does fit on a postcard, many taxpayers will also have to complete multiple schedules along with the form. And the TCJA has changed many tax breaks. We can help you ensure you file an accurate return that takes advantage of all of the breaks available to you.

© 2019

  January 3, 2018

 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: Key provisions affecting individuals

  On December 20, Congress completed passage of the largest federal tax reform law in more than 30 years. Commonly called the     “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act” (TCJA), the new law means substantial changes for individual taxpayers.

  The following is a brief overview of some of the most significant provisions.

  Except where noted, these changes are effective for     tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, and before January 1, 2026.

  • Drops of individual income tax rates ranging from 0 to 4 percentage points (depending on the bracket) to 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35% and 37%
  • Near doubling of the standard deduction to $24,000 (married couples filing jointly), $18,000 (heads of households), and $12,000 (singles and married couples filing separately)
  • Elimination of personal exemptions
  • Doubling of the child tax credit to $2,000 and other modifications intended to help more taxpayers benefit from the credit
  • Elimination of the individual mandate under the Affordable Care Act requiring taxpayers not covered by a qualifying health plan to pay a penalty — effective for months beginning after December 31, 2018, and permanent
  • Reduction of the adjusted gross income (AGI) threshold for the medical expense deduction to 7.5% for regular and AMT purposes — for 2017 and 2018
  • New $10,000 limit on the deduction for state and local taxes (on a combined basis for property and income taxes; $5,000 for separate filers)
  • Reduction of the mortgage debt limit for the home mortgage interest deduction to $750,000 ($375,000 for separate filers), with certain exceptions
  • Elimination of the deduction for interest on home equity debt
  • Elimination of the personal casualty and theft loss deduction (with an exception for federally declared disasters)
  • Elimination of miscellaneous itemized deductions subject to the 2% floor (such as certain investment expenses, professional fees and unreimbursed employee business expenses)
  • Elimination of the AGI-based reduction of certain itemized deductions
  • Elimination of the moving expense deduction (with an exception for members of the military in certain circumstances)
  • Expansion of tax-free Section 529 plan distributions to include those used to pay qualifying elementary and secondary school expenses, up to $10,000 per student per tax year — permanent
  • AMT exemption increase, to $109,400 for joint filers, $70,300 for singles and heads of households, and $54,700 for separate filers
  • Doubling of the gift and estate tax exemptions, to $10 million (expected to be $11.2 million for 2018 with inflation indexing)


  Be aware that additional rules and limits apply. Also, there are many more changes in the TCJA that will impact individuals.

  If you have questions or would like to discuss how you might be affected, please contact us.

© 2017

TAX TALK updates listed below are to help you in understanding your taxes better!  They also help you in taking advantage of current and upcoming tax credits and deductions.  Tax laws are constantly changing, so contact us with any questions.

November 8, 2018

Buy business assets before year end to reduce your 2018 tax liability

  The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) has enhanced two depreciation-related breaks that are popular year-end tax planning tools for   businesses. To take advantage of these breaks, you must purchase qualifying assets and place them in service by the end of the   tax year. That means there’s still time to reduce your 2018 tax liability with these breaks, but you need to act soon.

 Section 179 expensing

 Sec. 179 expensing is valuable because it allows businesses to deduct up to 100% of the cost of qualifying assets in Year 1 instead   of depreciating the cost over a number of years. Sec. 179 expensing can be used for assets such as equipment, furniture and   software. Beginning in 2018, the TCJA expanded the list of qualifying assets to include qualified improvement property, certain   property used primarily to furnish lodging and the following improvements to nonresidential real property: roofs, HVAC   equipment, fire protection and alarm systems, and security systems.

  The maximum Sec. 179 deduction for 2018 is $1 million, up from $510,000 for 2017. The deduction begins to phase out dollar-for-   dollar for 2018 when total asset acquisitions for the tax year exceed $2.5 million, up from $2.03 million for 2017.


 100% bonus depreciation

 For qualified assets that your business places in service in 2018, the TCJA allows you to claim 100% first-year bonus depreciation   compared to 50% in 2017. This break is available when buying computer systems, software, machinery, equipment and office   furniture. The TCJA has expanded eligible assets to include used assets; previously, only new assets were eligible.

 However, due to a TCJA drafting error, qualified improvement property will be eligible only if a technical correction is issued. Also, be aware that, under the TCJA, certain businesses aren’t eligible for bonus depreciation in 2018, such as real estate   businesses that elect to deduct 100% of their business interest and auto dealerships with floor plan financing (if the dealership   has average annual gross receipts of more than $25 million for the three previous tax years).


 Traditional, powerful strategy

 Keep in mind that Sec. 179 expensing and bonus depreciation can also be used for business vehicles. So purchasing vehicles   before year end could reduce your 2018 tax liability. But, depending on the type of vehicle, additional limits may apply.

 Investing in business assets is a traditional and powerful year-end tax planning strategy, and it might make even more sense in   2018 because of the TCJA enhancements to Sec. 179 expensing and bonus depreciation. If you have questions about these breaks   or other ways to maximize your depreciation deductions, please contact us.


© 2018

PREVIOUS TAX TALK UPDATES BELOW.

  September 13, 2016

  Documentation is the key to business expense deductions

  If you have incomplete or missing records and get audited by the IRS, your business will likely lose out on valuable deductions. Here are two recent   U.S. Tax Court cases that help illustrate the rules for documenting deductions.

  Case 1: Insufficient records

  In the first case, the court found that a taxpayer with a consulting business provided no proof to substantiate more than $52,000 in advertising expenses and $12,000 in travel expenses for the two years in question.

  The business owner said the travel expenses were incurred ”caring for his business.“ That isn’t enough. ”The taxpayer bears the burden of proving that claimed business expenses were actually incurred and were ordinary and necessary,“ the court stated. In addition, businesses must keep and produce ”records sufficient to enable the IRS to determine the correct tax liability.“ (TC Memo 2016-158)

  Case 2: Documents destroyed

  In another case, a taxpayer was denied many of the deductions claimed for his company. He traveled frequently for the business, which developed machine parts. In addition to travel, meals and entertainment, he also claimed printing and consulting deductions.

  The taxpayer recorded expenses in a spiral notebook and day planner and kept his records in a leased storage unit. While on a business trip to China, his documents were destroyed after the city where the storage unit was located acquired it by eminent domain.

  There’s a way for taxpayers to claim expenses if substantiating documents are lost through circumstances beyond their control (for example, in a fire or flood). However, the court noted that a taxpayer still has to ”undertake a ‘reasonable reconstruction,’ which includes substantiation through secondary evidence.“

  The court allowed 40% of the taxpayer’s travel, meals and entertainment expenses, but denied the remainder as well as the consulting and printing expenses. The reason? The taxpayer didn’t reconstruct those expenses through third-party sources or testimony from individuals whom he’d paid. (TC Memo 2016-135)

  Be prepared

  Keep detailed, accurate records to protect your business deductions. Record details about expenses as soon as possible after they’re incurred (for example, the date, place, business purpose, etc.). Keep more than just proof of payment. Also keep other documents, such as receipts, credit card slips and invoices. If you’re unsure of what you need, check with us.

  © 2016

 August 29, 2017

 The ABCs of the tax deduction for educator expenses

   At back-to-school time, much of the focus is on the students returning to the classroom — and on their  parents  buying them school supplies, backpacks, clothes, etc., for the new school year. But let’s not forget  about the teachers. It’s common for teachers to pay for some classroom supplies out of pocket, and the tax  code provides a special break that makes it a little easier for these educators to deduct some of their expenses.

  The miscellaneous itemized deduction

  Generally, your employee expenses are deductible if they’re unreimbursed by your employer and ordinary and  necessary to your business of being an employee. An expense is ordinary if it is common and accepted in your  business. An expense is necessary if it is appropriate and helpful to your business.

  These expenses must be claimed as a miscellaneous itemized deduction and are subject to a 2% of adjusted  gross income (AGI) floor. This means you’ll enjoy a tax benefit only if all your deductions subject to the floor,  combined, exceed 2% of your AGI. For many taxpayers, including teachers, this can be a difficult threshold to  meet.

  The educator expense deduction

  Congress created the educator expense deduction to allow more teachers and other educators to receive a tax  benefit from some of their unreimbursed out-of-pocket classroom expenses. The break was made permanent  under the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act of 2015. Since 2016, the deduction has been annually  indexed for inflation (though because of low inflation it hasn’t increased yet) and has included professional  development expenses.

  Qualifying elementary and secondary school teachers and other eligible educators (such as counselors and  principals) can deduct up to $250 of qualified expenses. (If you’re married filing jointly and both you and your  spouse are educators, you can deduct up to $500 of unreimbursed expenses — but not more than $250 each.)

  Qualified expenses include amounts paid or incurred during the tax year for books, supplies, computer  equipment (including related software and services), other equipment and supplementary materials that you  use in the classroom. For courses in health and physical education, the costs for supplies are qualified expenses  only if related to athletics.

  An added benefit

  The educator expense deduction is an “above-the-line” deduction, which means you don’t have to itemize and  it reduces your AGI, which has an added benefit: Because AGI-based limits affect a variety of tax breaks (such  as the previously mentioned miscellaneous itemized deductions), lowering your AGI might help you maximize  your tax breaks overall.

  Contact us for more details about the educator expense deduction or tax breaks available for other work-  related expenses.

© 2017

   June 30, 2016

  Finding the right tax-advantaged account to fund your health care expenses

  With health care costs continuing to climb, tax-friendly ways to pay for these expenses are more attractive than ever. Health Savings Accounts (HSAs), Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) and Health Reimbursement Accounts (HRAs) all provide opportunities for tax-advantaged funding of health care expenses. But what’s the difference between these three accounts? Here’s an overview:

  HSA. If you’re covered by a qualified high-deductible health plan (HDHP), you can contribute pretax income to an employer-sponsored HSA — or make deductible contributions to an HSA you set up yourself — up to $3,350 for self-only coverage and $6,750 for family coverage for 2016. Plus, if you’re age 55 or older, you may contribute an additional $1,000.

  You own the account, which can bear interest or be invested, growing tax-deferred similar to an IRA. Withdrawals for qualified medical expenses are tax-free, and you can carry over a balance from year to year.

  FSA. Regardless of whether you have an HDHP, you can redirect pretax income to an employer-sponsored FSA up to an employer-determined limit — not to exceed $2,550 in 2016. The plan pays or reimburses you for qualified medical expenses.

  What you don’t use by the plan year’s end, you generally lose — though your plan might allow you to roll over up to $500 to the next year. Or it might give you a 2 1/2-month grace period to incur expenses to use up the previous year’s contribution. If you have an HSA, your FSA is limited to funding certain “permitted” expenses.

  HRA. An HRA is an employer-sponsored account that reimburses you for medical expenses. Unlike an HSA, no HDHP is required. Unlike an FSA, any unused portion typically can be carried forward to the next year. And there’s no government-set limit on HRA contributions. But only your employer can contribute to an HRA; employees aren’t allowed to contribute.

  Questions? We’d be happy to answer them — or discuss other ways to save taxes in relation to your health care expenses.

  © 2016

 May 2, 2017

 Turning next year’s tax refund into cash in your pocket now

  Each year, millions of taxpayers claim an income tax refund. To be sure, receiving a payment from the IRS for a few thousand dollars can be a pleasant influx of cash. But it means you were essentially giving the government an interest-free loan for close to a year, which isn’t the best use of your money.

  Fortunately, there is a way to begin collecting your 2017 refund now: You can review the amounts you’re having withheld and/or what estimated tax payments you’re making, and adjust them to keep more money in your pocket during the year.

  Reasons to modify amounts

 It’s particularly important to check your withholding and/or estimated tax payments if:

 You received an especially large 2016 refund,
 You’ve gotten married or divorced or added a dependent,
 You’ve purchased a home,
 You’ve started or lost a job, or
 Your investment income has changed significantly.

 Even if you haven’t encountered any major life changes during the past year, changes in the tax law may affect withholding levels, making it worthwhile to double-check your withholding or estimated tax payments.

  Making a change

 You can modify your withholding at any time during the year, or even several times within a year. To do so, you simply submit a new Form W-4 to your employer. Changes typically will go into effect several weeks after the new Form W-4 is submitted. For estimated tax payments, you can make adjustments each time quarterly payments are due.

 While reducing withholdings or estimated tax payments will, indeed, put more money in your pocket now, you also need to be careful that you don’t reduce them too much. If you don’t pay enough tax during the year, you could end up owing interest and penalties when you file your return, even if you pay your outstanding tax liability by the April 2018 deadline.

 If you’d like help determining what your withholding or estimated tax payments should be for the rest of the year, please contact us.

  © 2017

Year-end tax and financial to-do list for individuals

December 11, 2018

With the dawn of 2019 on the near horizon, here’s a quick list of tax and financial to-dos you should address before 2018 ends:

Check your FSA balance. If you have a Flexible Spending Account (FSA) for health care expenses, you need to incur qualifying expenses by December 31 to use up these funds or you’ll potentially lose them. (Some plans allow you to carry over up to $500 to the following year or give you a 2½-month grace period to incur qualifying expenses.) Use expiring FSA funds to pay for eyeglasses, dental work or eligible drugs or health products.

Max out tax-advantaged savings. Reduce your 2018 income by contributing to traditional IRAs, employer-sponsored retirement plans or Health Savings Accounts to the extent you’re eligible. (Certain vehicles, including traditional and SEP IRAs, allow you to deduct contributions on your 2018 return if they’re made by April 15, 2019.)

Take RMDs. If you’ve reached age 70½, you generally must take required minimum distributions (RMDs) from IRAs or qualified employer-sponsored retirement plans before the end of the year to avoid a 50% penalty. If you turned 70½ this year, you have until April 1, 2019, to take your first RMD. But keep in mind that, if you defer your first distribution, you’ll have to take two next year.

Consider a QCD. If you’re 70½ or older and charitably inclined, a qualified charitable distribution (QCD) allows you to transfer up to $100,000 tax-free directly from your IRA to a qualified charity and to apply the amount toward your RMD. This is a big advantage if you wouldn’t otherwise qualify for a charitable deduction (because you don’t itemize, for example).

Use it or lose it. Make the most of annual limits that don’t carry over from year to year, even if doing so won’t provide an income tax deduction. For example, if gift and estate taxes are a concern, make annual exclusion gifts up to $15,000 per recipient. If you have a Coverdell Education Savings Account, contribute the maximum amount you’re allowed.

Contribute to a Sec. 529 plan. Sec. 529 prepaid tuition or college savings plans aren’t subject to federal annual contribution limits and don’t provide a federal income tax deduction. But contributions may entitle you to a state income tax deduction (depending on your state and plan).

Review withholding. The IRS cautions that people with more complex tax situations face the possibility of having their income taxes underwithheld due to changes under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Use its withholding calculator (available at irs.gov) to review your situation. If it looks like you could face underpayment penalties, increase withholdings from your or your spouse’s wages for the remainder of the year. (Withholdings, unlike estimated tax payments, are treated as if they were paid evenly over the year.)

For assistance with these and other year-end planning ideas, please contact us.

© 2018

 AUGUST 21, 2018


  Play your tax cards right with gambling wins and losses

  If you gamble, be sure you understand the tax consequences. Both wins and losses can affect your income tax bill.   And changes under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) could also have an impact.

  Wins and taxable income

 You must report 100% of your gambling winnings as taxable income. The value of complimentary goodies (“comps”) provided by gambling establishments must also be included in taxable income as winnings.

  Winnings are subject to your regular federal income tax rate. You might pay a lower rate on gambling winnings this year because of rate reductions under the TCJA.

 Amounts you win may be reported to you on IRS Form W-2G (“Certain Gambling Winnings”). In some cases, federal  income tax may be withheld, too. Anytime a Form W-2G is issued, the IRS gets a copy. So if you’ve received such a form, remember that the IRS will expect to see the winnings on your tax return.

   Losses and tax deductions

  You can write off gambling losses as a miscellaneous itemized deduction. While miscellaneous deductions subject to the 2% of adjusted gross income floor are not allowed for 2018 through 2025 under the TCJA, the deduction for gambling losses isn’t subject to that floor. So gambling losses are still deductible.

  But the TCJA’s near doubling of the standard deduction for 2018 (to $24,000 for married couples filing jointly, $18,000 for heads of households and $12,000 for singles and separate filers) means that, even if you typically itemized deductions in the past, you may no longer benefit from itemizing. Itemizing saves tax only when total itemized deductions exceed the applicable standard deduction.

  Also be aware that the deduction for gambling losses is limited to your winnings for the year, and any excess losses cannot be carried forward to future years. Also, out-of-pocket expenses for transportation, meals, lodging and so forth can’t be deducted unless you qualify as a gambling professional.

  And, for 2018 through 2025, the TCJA modifies the limit on gambling losses for professional gamblers so that all deductions for expenses incurred in carrying out gambling activities, not just losses, are limited to the extent of gambling winnings.

  Tracking your activities

  To claim a deduction for gambling losses, you must adequately document them, including:

  1. The date and type of gambling activity.
  2. The name and address or location of the gambling establishment.
  3. The names of other persons (if any) present with you at the gambling establishment. (Obviously, this is not possible when the gambling occurs at a public venue such as a casino, race track, or bingo parlor.)
  4. The amount won or lost.


  You can document income and losses from gambling on table games by recording the number of the table you played and keeping statements showing casino credit issued to you. For lotteries, you can use winning statements and unredeemed tickets as documentation.

  Please contact us if you have questions or want more information about the tax treatment of gambling wins and losses.

  © 2018

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